#VENICE (Info)

An ongoing long-term documentary project on the socio-environmental impact of global issues on the city of Venice.

 

Before coronavirus, Venice arguably withstood the world’s highest tourist pressure for an urban space: almost 30 million visitors per year vs. a local population 50,000 permanent residents. As if the huge influx of tourists flooding the city was not enough, Venice also suffer actual water floods. Seasonally, repeated episodes of high tide affect the city, and sea level rise is worsening the situation, making floods more frequent.

With these and other severe problems affecting the city, should not surprise that Venice was losing residents. In fact, the city lost more than 2/3 of its resident population in the last 6 decades, and is now inhabited by a decreasing 50 thousand permanent residents.

#VENICE is an ongoing long-term documentary project on the socio-environmental impact of global issues like mass tourism, covid-19 and climate change on a fragile, unique and ancient city.

I heard of a restless city, fragile in between tides (2019)

In Venice, floods of tourists alternated with actual water floods. And the survival of the city itself is considered at risk.

The Floods (2019) 

The week of 11th – 17th November 2019 was one of the worst in Venice’s history. In 6 days, the sea water flooded the city 3 times, with tide peaks (‘acqua alta’ in Italian) reaching almost unprecedented levels.

Maree (2019)

A visual comparison between two very different types of floods.

2 minutes in Venice (2019)

A cruise ship navigates the Giudecca Canal, in Venice's old town, to reach the city's cruise port.

Zerotourism: Venice (Video installation, 2020)

Springtime would normally mark the start of the super-high tourist season in Venice, when the narrow streets of the city are normally overcrowded with tourists. But the covid-19 outbreak completely halted tourism.

error: All images on this website are copyrighted © 2020 Marco Panzetti