The Most Serene

Venice is also known in Italian with its historic name of ‘La Serenissima’, or ‘The most serene’ in English. Though these are not at all serene times for Venice.

With approximately 50,000 permanent residents and almost 30 million visitors per year, Venice arguably withstands the world’s highest tourist pressure for an urban space.
But mass tourism is not the only flood affecting Venice. Every year, repeated episodes of water high tide affect the city, and climate change is worsening the situation, making floods more frequent.

With these and other severe problems affecting the city, should not surprise that Venice is losing residents. In fact, the city lost more than 2/3 of its resident population in the last 6 decades, and is now inhabited by a decreasing 50 thousand permanent residents.

The Most Serene is an ongoing long-term documentary project on the city of Venice. Specifically, on the socio-environmental impact of global issues like mass tourism, gentrification and climate change on a fragile, unique and ancient city.

#Venice (2019 - Ongoing)

With approximately 50,000 permanent residents and almost 30 million visitors per year, Venice arguably withstands the world’s highest tourist pressure for an urban space. At the same time, Venice lost more than 2/3 of its resident population in the last 6 decades.

Venice Floods (2019 - Ongoing) 

The week of 11th – 17th November 2019 was one of the worst in Venice’s history. In 6 days, the sea water flooded the city 3 times, with tide peaks (‘acqua alta’ in Italian) reaching almost unprecedented levels.

Maree (2019 - Ongoing)

With approximately 50,000 permanent residents and almost 30 million visitors per year, Venice arguably withstands the world’s highest tourist pressure for an urban space.
But mass tourism is not the only flood affecting Venice.
Every year repeated episodes of water high tide affect the city, and climate change is worsening the situation, making it more frequent. In November 2019, the sea water flooded the city multiple times, with tide peaks reaching almost unprecedented levels.

error: All images on this website are copyrighted © 2019 Marco Panzetti